Fillmore

fillmore

I seem to be on a Corinth kick lately. For some reason, I sit down to write and my head suddenly fills with stories and memories of Corinth. Thankfully I have a few pictures to coincide with the things I want to write about. Or maybe it's the other way around.

Regardless, I ran across this picture last night and decided it was ripe for some attention.

Growing up in Corinth, it seemed that everything revolved around Fillmore Street. It's where most of us lined the sidewalks to watch the Corinth High School Homecoming Parade, as well as Corinth's Christmas Parade. Corinth's one and only public library is on Fillmore Street. Across from the library you have the First Baptist Church. For years, the best clothing stores in town were on Fillmore - The Hammond House, Reid Bros. and James Lindsey. When I was a young kid, the post office was downtown on Fillmore. The oldest jewelry store in Corinth, Wait's, was across Fillmore from Reid Bros. Further down from there, you have Hamburger Harold's. And Corinth's first "premier" bed and breakfast, the General's Quarters, is on Fillmore, as well.

My family also had personal ties to Fillmore. It's where the family business, J. R. Laughlin & Sons, had its office in a civil war era house. We eventually turned the office back into a house and moved into it in 1987. My friend, Sarah Lyle Coleman, lived across the street. I went to church a block or so down from our house at the First United Methodist Church. My father worked at Reid Bros. on Fillmore when he was in high school. My great uncle, as well as my great grandfather, worked for the railroad, and the depot was downtown off Fillmore Street.

To some of you, all of this means nothing. I totally understand...I'm really just talking about some street that runs through the middle of some small southern town. Ok. Great. So what?

But to those of us that are from Corinth and spent our formative years there...to those that are still there...Fillmore Street, in my opinion, is much more than just a street. I think it represents perseverance, in a way. Corinth has seen its fair share of hard times over the years, as most small towns have. Every time I go back to visit, it seems that yet another business has either moved or closed all together. Many of the businesses on Fillmore have done just that. But the traditions haven't. And to those of us that find pleasure in remembering the way things used to be, those memories in some ways keep the flame burning...they are so vivid that it's almost like things never changed.

Change is inevitable. I understand that. We all do. But I find comfort in the fact that at any point in time, I can go back to Corinth and drive down Fillmore Street and despite how much things have changed, in some ways they actually haven't. I can't wait for my kids to one day watch the Christmas Parade and anxiously wait for Santa to appear at the end on the last float. To watch as they scramble into the street to grab candy that's been thrown from a car or a float or even Santa himself. I can't wait to see Sloane staring in awe at the Corinth cheerleaders in the homecoming parade...or for Hunter, Miller and Bates to watch the Warriors run onto the field at the beginning of the homecoming football game later that night.

I'll most definitely be making a trip to Corinth soon and can't wait to pay ol' Fillmore a visit...